IBIA Urge Australia Govt To Lift In-Play Limits

The International Betting Integrity Association (IBIA) has urged Australia ‘s government to lift limits on in-play betting as a way of further protecting its regulated sports betting industry and customers from black market hazards.

As part of its response to an open consultation on the Australian Sports Wagering Scheme (ASWS), the IBIA made its argument – Australia’s credibility system that protects sports from abuse.

The consultation was conducted to collect information as the Australian government reviews its federal sport integrity protections, allocating the eventual implementation of a new regulatory agency called ‘Sport Integrity Australia (SIA).’

Through its remit, the SIA will become the main data collection agency for all of Australia’s syndicated professional sports and act as a ‘integrity task force’ to track sports betting transactions.

SIA ‘s implementation was officially proposed as one of 52 suggestions outlined in the ‘Wood Review 2018’ on the safety of Australian sports.

In its response, the IBIA reported its disappointment that, as suggested by the Wood Review two years ago, the Australian Government had not made progress on removing in-play wagering restrictions.

“It is particularly disappointing that the Government has not supported the Wood Review’s recommendation on in-play betting to properly address the integrity challenges presented by offshore betting, notably unregulated or poorly regulated Asian betting operators,” the IBIA said.

“The absence of an effective and coherent policy on in-play betting is detrimental to the regulated market.”

More issues were noted by IBIA that the federal government had not set up a ‘overriding argument’ for the establishment of SIA as a centralised Australian sports organisation.

The IBIA claimed that some sports, states and territorial authorities remain “unconvinced about the necessity for large-scale change to the existing arrangements which are already deemed to be effective’.

The IBIA stated in its recommendations that the government should effectively strengthen the current ASWS system by providing requirements for Australian racing that have been excluded leading to a ‘major void in any Australian strategy of integrity.’

The IBIA concluded: “Whilst we therefore understand the Government’s aspiration to harmonise a wide range of powers currently made at state and territory level and to establish a universal approach across Australia, our discussions with industry stakeholders have been clear that, at this point, a departure from the existing and well-established approach is not seen as necessary or desirable.”