DCMS Authorise Stephen Cohen Re-Election As UKGC Commissioner

The re-election of Stephen Cohen as Commissioner of the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) has been authorised by Oliver Dowden, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport ( DCMS).

DCMS announced this week that Cohen’s term as UKGC commissioner will be extended until November 2024 for another four years.

Described as an expert in mass-market corporate finance, auditing, and governance, Cohen has served on the board of commissioners of the UKGC since 2016. He has also served as the chair of both the JPMorgan Japan Trust and the Schroder UK Public-Private Trust audit committees.

Currently, the executive is a board member for the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC), the organisation responsible for regulatory oversight of 370,000 health care professionals.

The re-election of Stephen Cohen as Commissioner of the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) has been authorised by Oliver Dowden, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport ( DCMS).

DCMS announced this week that Cohen’s term as UKGC commissioner will be extended until November 2024 for another four years.

Described as an specialist in mass-market corporate finance, auditing and governance, Cohen has worked on the board of commissioners of the UKGC since 2016. He has also served as the chair of both the JPMorgan Japan Trust and the Schroder UK Public-Private Trust’s audit committee.

Currently, the executive is a board member for the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC), the organisation responsible for regulatory oversight of 370,000 health care professionals.

DCMS reported that Cohen would be paying £ 295 a day in compliance with the Cabinet Office ‘s public appointment governance codes.

Cohen’s nomination was announced before the House of Lords released its ‘Gambling Harm-Time for Action,’ in which a special committee of parliament called for the government to introduce a roots-and-branch reform of UK gambling.

The Lords Committee, recommending 66 urgent actions, considered that a change in the UK gambling regime was needed to ‘prioritise the welfare of gamblers ahead of industry profits.’